wealth

The Reality of Survivalism

In the first part of this post, I discussed how the post-industrial world and its associated ills have created the modern fascination with the apocalypse. Since this fringe-turned-pop culture movement is based in fantasy and imagination, rather than actual experience, it has given birth to a number of fallacies.

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Riots in Buenos Aires, 2001

In 2001, the Argentine government defaulted on its loans and un-pegged the peso from the dollar, resulting in a swift devaluation. Along with the lead up to these events – high unemployment, unavailability of credit, a loss of faith in public institutions and rampant inflation, more than half the country was plunged into poverty, looting and riots.

After some research on the experiences of Argentines in a post economic collapse environment,  I’ve summarised some of the misconceptions about what surviving entails. (more…)

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Class and Status in the 21st Century

18th century hunting party

Society has undergone a process of democratization. Whereas once one’s parents’ occupation, and one’s own, as well as corresponding tastes, speech, dress and mannerisms could designate one as ‘blue collar’, ‘middle class’ or ‘upper-middle’, the economy has undergone such a restructuring that it’s longer possible to reliably estimate a person’s background and lifestyle having only observed one or two of these markers.

Take for example, the working class. (more…)

The Education-Industrial complex

Worthless

My inspiration for this post/review comes from heretical economist Aaron Clarey, and his book, Worthless. There is a growing awareness in non-mainstream circles of the wholesale rort that is higher education. In the seventies and earlier, it was the case that a large percentage of high school students would only study until the tenth grade – from which point they would study a trade, or work in a family business. Students that showed academic promise would finish their twelfth or thirteenth year, and could go on to attend university to become a professional, academic or teacher. Masters and First-class honours, let alone PhDs were exceedingly rare, and accordingly had value, to those who completed them and those around them who admired higher learning and research. How times have changed! (more…)