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The Homestead Fantasy

It is something of a ritual for young 20-somethings to read Walden; or A Life in the Woods, and pine for the simple truths of life to reveal themselves while amongst nature, to follow the path laid out by the 19th century transcendentalist, Henry David Thoreau:

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms.”

Combine this spiritual quest with the modern incarnation of the American frontiersmen, the Tea Party constitutionalist, who wishes to escape the clutches of the bureaucratic police-state, and be left alone to fly his Gadsden Flag and watch Alex Jones, and you have the 21st century Neo-Homesteader. (more…)

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The Challenge of the Identitarian

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Identitarianism, for those unfamiliar with the term, is both a political ideology and general worldview that places one’s extended ethnic family at the centre of considerations of state, religion and politics (more…)

Charting the Fringes

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Since starting this blog I’ve sensed that there are two types of readers – those in my personal circles/stumblers from Google and readers of the blogosphere/bloggers. Since it has taken most in the ‘blogosphere’ or in alternative media in general a substantial commitment in time, effort and personal development to arrive at their points of view, I’ve put together a brief background of some of my influences for the ‘uninitiated’.  Or have a look at my Blogroll. (more…)

The Reality of Survivalism

In the first part of this post, I discussed how the post-industrial world and its associated ills have created the modern fascination with the apocalypse. Since this fringe-turned-pop culture movement is based in fantasy and imagination, rather than actual experience, it has given birth to a number of fallacies.

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Riots in Buenos Aires, 2001

In 2001, the Argentine government defaulted on its loans and un-pegged the peso from the dollar, resulting in a swift devaluation. Along with the lead up to these events – high unemployment, unavailability of credit, a loss of faith in public institutions and rampant inflation, more than half the country was plunged into poverty, looting and riots.

After some research on the experiences of Argentines in a post economic collapse environment,  I’ve summarised some of the misconceptions about what surviving entails. (more…)

Action vs. Reaction

I have given much thought to the idea of the rational actor. While an action stands on its own as a whole, complete and deliberate set of motions, a reaction stems directly from circumstances created outside of your control. This is where it intersects with manipulation. It would be fair to say that one who does not react makes himself less of a target for manipulation. Strings pull puppets.

A recent conversation with a friend gave rise to this question: when is one behaving rationally, and when is one being manipulated to react ‘rationally’ – in such a way so as to elicit the exact behavior desired by those who seek your manipulation? (more…)

The Right Side of History

Success may be interpreted as a combination of being content with one’s position and satisfied with accomplishments that are in some way recognised within a broader community. (I don’t recognise the authority of your LARP King – or your WoW level 42 dwarf existence!). I posit that being on the “right side of history” is an essential element to overcoming hurdles and taking advantages of the changes that occur on a major scale around the world. This involves a degree of luck for many who happen to be in the right place at the right time. What I am concerned with is how one can identify trends on a macro level within countries and around the world; socially, economically and ideologically, so as to profit from them personally. (more…)

Class and Status in the 21st Century

18th century hunting party

Society has undergone a process of democratization. Whereas once one’s parents’ occupation, and one’s own, as well as corresponding tastes, speech, dress and mannerisms could designate one as ‘blue collar’, ‘middle class’ or ‘upper-middle’, the economy has undergone such a restructuring that it’s longer possible to reliably estimate a person’s background and lifestyle having only observed one or two of these markers.

Take for example, the working class. (more…)

Why you need an online business

In this ‘post-industrial’ age of service and consumption based economies in the western world, jobs are not what they used to be. The days of working for an employer for 25+ years, taking long service leave and retiring with a gold watch are relics of the past. I’m sure you’ve heard that before, but I point out the key difference – most commentators will tell you that the key to success in the modern workplace is to abandon loyalty, stay ‘adaptable’ and ‘dynamic’, and deal with chopping and changing employers, and even careers. There is usually some mention of ‘Gen Y’ and how they have different values. What a load of poppyco*k. The real reason why young workers don’t have ‘loyalty’ (as though this is a measurable metric) is that the employment market with its needless credentialism (‘Masters preferred’ for your clerical job, anyone?), insecurity and low rates of pay do not offer a steady career path of meaningful, and dignified work.

Time_Millennial (more…)

The Education-Industrial complex

Worthless

My inspiration for this post/review comes from heretical economist Aaron Clarey, and his book, Worthless. There is a growing awareness in non-mainstream circles of the wholesale rort that is higher education. In the seventies and earlier, it was the case that a large percentage of high school students would only study until the tenth grade – from which point they would study a trade, or work in a family business. Students that showed academic promise would finish their twelfth or thirteenth year, and could go on to attend university to become a professional, academic or teacher. Masters and First-class honours, let alone PhDs were exceedingly rare, and accordingly had value, to those who completed them and those around them who admired higher learning and research. How times have changed! (more…)